Professional iOS Network Programming

Professional iOS Network Programming is a 360 page book I co-wrote with two other exceptional iOS developers, Nathan Jones and Jack Cox, to share our collective experience writing enterprise iOS apps.

Almost every iOS app interacts with a web service in some way, even if only for Twitter or Facebook integration, however most enterprise mobility efforts heavily depend on reliable integration with web services. Whether a Fortune 500 company is in customer service, retail, finance, or consumer goods; odds are it already has many backend systems that must integrate together to provide customers with the features they expect on a mobile device. We describe integration, service architecture, and development patterns to tie these disparate services together into a smoothly functioning application.

The book covers topics like security, caching, and network testing that can apply to any networked app, but also covers more specific functionality like push notifications, GameKit, and Bonjour. Each chapter includes one or more example applications that demonstrate the chapter's topic with clear, well-commented, and easy-to-follow code.

Professional iOS Network Programming

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Part 1: Understanding iOS and Enterprise Networking
    1. Introducing iOS Networking Capabilities
    2. Designing Your Service Architecture
  • Part 2: HTTP Requests: The Workhorse of iOS Networking
    1. Making Requests
    2. Generating and Digesting Payloads
    3. Handling Errors
  • Part 3: Advanced Networking Techniques
    1. Securing Network Traffic
    2. Optimizing Request Performance
    3. Low-Level Networking
    4. Testing and Manipulating Network Traffic
    5. Using Push Notifications
  • Part 4: Networking App to App
    1. Inter-App Communication
    2. Device-to-Device Communication with Game Kit
    3. Ad-Hoc Networking with Bonjour
If these topics interest you, I'd highly recommend purchasing a copy of Professional iOS Network Programming.

@jszumski

  • Similarly Face ID with the new iMacs. Maybe the IR dot field spreads too far at typical sitting distances? 20 hours ago
  • I'm incredibly surprised that the new Apple TV remote doesn't have a U1 chip. Finding a remote in the couch cushions has to be a universal annoyance. 20 hours ago
  • RT @jckarter: @soffes @abdulajet Not the random-access one, if you look closely. Appending and lookup into an array should still be slightly cheaper than a Deque 16 days ago